Police Stations: What Should I Do?

How to answer the question of whether to have a solicitor

Our Answer

Often people are confused about whether to have a solicitor at the police station. This might seem strange when it is a fundamental right to have a solicitor but also a FREE service! However, sometimes, thoughts such as 'I haven't done anything wrong why do I need a solicitor?' enter the person's mind. Or the person may have been detained in the police station for some time and are told that to have a solciitor will cause extra delay. In fact, less than 50% of people who are detained or under investigation seek legal representation whilst in the police station. It is often the case, however that they seek help from a lawyer after the event!

In our experience this can be like shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted! More often than not what happens at the police station has a CRTICAL bearing on what happens thereafter. It is so very important in our opinion to get the right advice EARLY. Our experinced team will be able to assist you in most cases FREE of CHARGE when you attend the police station even as a 'volunteer' (i.e. not under arrest). Ring us first before you or your loved one goes along so that we can attend with you and give you the proper advice you are entitled to.

It doesn't even matter what time of the day or night it is - we provide a round-the-clock 24 HOUR service. Call us on 01634 832332 (9am to 5pm) or 0844 567 6717 at any other time.

Free Guide.

Please click on the link below to receive a complimenatry download - our GUIDE TO ARREST

Guide To Arrest

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An Example.

Recently we advised a gentleman who came to us after he had admitted an offence of dishonesty in the police station whilst unrepresented. The man informed us that he had not committed the offence but had agreed to caution thinking it was the best option and had signed the relevant documentation. He contacted us because he had since found that he could not obtain employment in his usual chosen field because of the caution showing on his CRB record. From what we were told we believe that getting the right advice would have avoided this devastating outcome for this man.

On the other hand sometimes it is the best advice to accept a caution. We also have experience of someone who was offered a caution whilst unrepresented but declined and found himself being prosecuted in the Crown Court!

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